Volvo Community Forum. The Forums of the Volvo Owners Club

Forum Rules Volvo Owners Club About VOC Volvo Gallery Links Volvo History Volvo Press
Go Back   Volvo Owners Club Forum > "Technical Topics" > 200 Series General

Notices

200 Series General Forum for the Volvo 240 and 260 cars

Information
  • VOC Members: There is no login facility using your VOC membership number or the details from page 3 of the club magazine. You need to register in the normal way
  • AOL Customers: Make sure you check the 'Remember me' check box otherwise the AOL system may log you out during the session. This is a known issue with AOL.
  • AOL, Yahoo and Plus.net users. Forum owners such as us are finding that AOL, Yahoo and Plus.net are blocking a lot of email generated from forums. This may mean your registration activation and other emails will not get to you, or they may appear in your spam mailbox

Thread Informations

240 GLT saloon restoration project

Views : 5888

Replies : 128

Users Viewing This Thread :  

Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
Old Oct 13th, 2021, 09:37   #121
Othen
Premier Member
 
Othen's Avatar
 

Last Online: Today 09:34
Join Date: Jan 2020
Location: Corby
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Juular View Post
This is exactly the first method I tried. I used some good quality M12 bar and fabricated my own bits and pieces from 2mm steel and 40x3mm angle. With a lot of swearing they only got about half way and wouldn't go any further. I ended up stripping the threads off the bar. On my second attempt my breaker bar started to creak like it was going to shear!

I actually went one step further - I don't like to give up. I made my own hydraulic press of sorts by creating a frame for my trolley jack.



This achieved nothing. I actually managed to bend the metal of the frame and my jack was creaking long before any movement happened on the bushes.

I think they're going to need at least a 4 ton press.
I suppose this comes down to pretty fine tolerances. Once I got the bush seated properly with the home made tool it went in quite easily - I think the important thing is to keep everything absolutely straight.

That was quite an ingenious jig you made for your trolley jack - I think again the problem will be keeping everything absolutely straight - whereas a trolley jack necessarily follows an arc. I'm wondering whether that jig would work with a bottle jack instead of a trolley?

A proper press (like the one Luke has) made the whole job very easy indeed. Because it always pushes in a straight line it is quite easy to ensure everything stays well aligned. I was even thinking of buying a press (they start at under 100) - but then I would probably only use it once every couple of years. If I was replacing all the bushes both ends it might well justify a purchase?

Alan
__________________

Last edited by Othen; Oct 13th, 2021 at 09:52. Reason: Addition.
Othen is online now   Reply With Quote
The Following User Says Thank You to Othen For This Useful Post:
Old Oct 13th, 2021, 09:53   #122
Juular
Member
 

Last Online: Today 09:02
Join Date: Sep 2020
Location: Falkirk
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Othen View Post
I suppose this comes down to pretty fine tolerances. Once I got the bush seated properly with the home made tool it went in quite easily - I think the important thing is to keep everything absolutely straight.

That was quite an ingenious jig you made for your trolley jack - I think again the problem will be keeping everything absolutely straight - whereas a trolley jack necessarily follows an arc.

A proper press (like the one Luke has) made the whole job very easy indeed. Because it always pushes in a straight line it is quite easy to ensure everything stays well aligned. I was even thinking of buying a press (they start at under 100) - but then I would probably only use it once every couple of years. If I was replacing all the bushes both ends it might well justify a purchase?

Alan
It's a bit like having a van or a set of ramps. I think you'd suddenly become everyone's "best friend"!
Juular is online now   Reply With Quote
The Following 2 Users Say Thank You to Juular For This Useful Post:
Old Oct 13th, 2021, 10:15   #123
Laird Scooby
Premier Member
 
Laird Scooby's Avatar
 

Last Online: Yesterday 23:19
Join Date: May 2012
Location: Lakenheath
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Othen View Post
I suppose this comes down to pretty fine tolerances. Once I got the bush seated properly with the home made tool it went in quite easily - I think the important thing is to keep everything absolutely straight.

That was quite an ingenious jig you made for your trolley jack - I think again the problem will be keeping everything absolutely straight - whereas a trolley jack necessarily follows an arc. I'm wondering whether that jig would work with a bottle jack instead of a trolley?


Alan
The trolley jack idea doesn't work for exactly the reason you describe Alan, the fact the trolley jack follows an arc. Also there tends to be a lot od "slop" in the various linkages of a trolley jack, not usually a problem when lifting a car as a little flexibility is actually helpful but for using the jack as the power part of a press that slop makes it a no-go.

I also have 2 smaller similar frames made from box section and have successfully used a bottle jack to press out a wheel bearing, my "winter project" for this year is to beef it up and fit exact landing position plates (so i can remove and use the bottle jack for other things too) for the bottle jack and also on the back of it, fit a couple of lengths of angle iron, one with two sets of bearings (covered in a length of tube each), the other with a central set of bearings covered in a longer tube with a handle attached to the tube to create a ring-roller - the jack would apply the pressure to enable the curves to be rolled.

It's certainly the basis of a useful tool, maybe my ideas will give Juular an idea how to repurpose/reinvent his frame to make himself a useful tool.
__________________
Cheers

Dave

Next Door to Top-Gun with a Rover 827 Sterling and a 765 GLEa V6!
Laird Scooby is offline   Reply With Quote
The Following User Says Thank You to Laird Scooby For This Useful Post:
Old Oct 13th, 2021, 10:17   #124
Othen
Premier Member
 
Othen's Avatar
 

Last Online: Today 09:34
Join Date: Jan 2020
Location: Corby
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Juular View Post
It's a bit like having a van or a set of ramps. I think you'd suddenly become everyone's "best friend"!
Absolutely! I find that having a 3/4t trailer makes me popular in the same way!

Sometimes it is worth investing in a fairly specialised tool just for a few uses though - I've done that quite a few times (things like coil spring compressors and motorcycle chain riveters come to mind). I've found that if I buy the cheaper (normally either Chinese or Indian manufactured) items they are made well enough to last a lot of occasional use and cheaper than paying a garage for even just 2 or 3 jobs. I'm thinking that if I ever changed all the bushes front and back on the RB it would be worth paying 90 for a press.

Alan

PS. One like this: https://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/283628996...4AAOSw3LphVsqr
__________________

Last edited by Othen; Oct 13th, 2021 at 10:24.
Othen is online now   Reply With Quote
The Following User Says Thank You to Othen For This Useful Post:
Old Oct 13th, 2021, 10:34   #125
Laird Scooby
Premier Member
 
Laird Scooby's Avatar
 

Last Online: Yesterday 23:19
Join Date: May 2012
Location: Lakenheath
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Othen View Post
Absolutely! I find that having a 3/4t trailer makes me popular in the same way!

Sometimes it is worth investing in a fairly specialised tool just for a few uses though - I've done that quite a few times (things like coil spring compressors and motorcycle chain riveters come to mind). I've found that if I buy the cheaper (normally either Chinese or Indian manufactured) items they are made well enough to last a lot of occasional use and cheaper than paying a garage for even just 2 or 3 jobs. I'm thinking that if I ever changed all the bushes front and back on the RB it would be worth paying 90 for a press.

Alan

PS. One like this: https://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/283628996...4AAOSw3LphVsqr
Or fire up your welder and make one from a 5T bottle jack! I'd suggest mounting the bottle jack at the bottom so it presses upwards, not conventional i know but there are obvious advantages.
__________________
Cheers

Dave

Next Door to Top-Gun with a Rover 827 Sterling and a 765 GLEa V6!
Laird Scooby is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Oct 13th, 2021, 10:42   #126
Juular
Member
 

Last Online: Today 09:02
Join Date: Sep 2020
Location: Falkirk
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Laird Scooby View Post
Or fire up your welder and make one from a 5T bottle jack! I'd suggest mounting the bottle jack at the bottom so it presses upwards, not conventional i know but there are obvious advantages.
I think this is what I'll be doing in the future, although the price of steel box section has become quite steep recently. It might actually be more economical to buy one.
Juular is online now   Reply With Quote
The Following 2 Users Say Thank You to Juular For This Useful Post:
Old Oct 13th, 2021, 11:31   #127
Laird Scooby
Premier Member
 
Laird Scooby's Avatar
 

Last Online: Yesterday 23:19
Join Date: May 2012
Location: Lakenheath
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Juular View Post
I think this is what I'll be doing in the future, although the price of steel box section has become quite steep recently. It might actually be more economical to buy one.
There's a reason why the ready-made ones are still cheap! Probably made from cheaper Chinese steel.

I used box because it was what i had lying around, similar i suspect to why you used angle for your frame. As for the kink in one side, you bent it with a jack, you can straighten it with a jack! Alternatively, get two small blocks of wood and a longer length, make a bridge from them then use a G-Clamp or similar to pull the bent bit straight then weld some reinforcement onto it. Alternatively use some washers each end as shims, use a second piece of angle as the bridge part of the reinforcement, clamp in the middle to pull the bent part "past straight" then weld in the middle. Once cool, knock the shims out and weld all the way along to gain a double reinforced section that should now be straight.

I also need to straighten one side of one of the frames i made from box, my trolley jack bent that too. The bottle jack didn't bend the second frame i made to get that wheel bearing out. I'll use a similar method to what i've described to straighten my "banana box" section.
__________________
Cheers

Dave

Next Door to Top-Gun with a Rover 827 Sterling and a 765 GLEa V6!
Laird Scooby is offline   Reply With Quote
The Following User Says Thank You to Laird Scooby For This Useful Post:
Old Oct 13th, 2021, 11:51   #128
Othen
Premier Member
 
Othen's Avatar
 

Last Online: Today 09:34
Join Date: Jan 2020
Location: Corby
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Laird Scooby View Post
There's a reason why the ready-made ones are still cheap! Probably made from cheaper Chinese steel.
... but in my experience (with occasional use specialist tools) that is always perfectly adequate. If I was running a workshop where the press was in use every day it would be sensible to buy a more expensive one. For a tool (such as a spring compressor, chain riveter, press...) that might be used 10-20 times in its whole lifetime Chinese or Indian made items are most adequate.
__________________
Othen is online now   Reply With Quote
The Following User Says Thank You to Othen For This Useful Post:
Old Oct 14th, 2021, 02:46   #129
DW42
Senior Member
 

Last Online: Oct 21st, 2021 21:49
Join Date: Feb 2011
Location: Currumbin, Queensland
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Juular View Post
I'm using standard rubber bushings from PFS.

I do think there's a bit of confusion regarding the metal shells. On the axle bushes, definitely leave the metal shell in place as otherwise there's very little support for the bush.

On the other arms I'm not sure how any bush would go in unless you remove the shells. They become very corroded, and normally with poly bushes in solid voids, you just press them in as they are.

I've not heard back from the garage in ages, I wonder if they are struggling with them..
I think Juular has answered most of the bushing removal issues: for the panhard rod and reaction rods (apologies if I've named these incorrectly) the housing is solid metal and the old bushing shells should be removed for new ones to fit. Disregard the new bushing instructions if they tell you to leave the metal shells in. For many of the new ones, particularly poly ones, a press shouldn't be required, just the grease supplied with the new bushing. On the trailing arm the housings are loops rather than solid, and the shell needs to be left in if the new bushings didn't come in a metal shell. The big rear bushing is easy if you have the special tool. I made a simple one, then bought the real thing when one came up on ebay. The front trailing arm bush is where Juular is having problems, and I don't know the solution. It may be possible to build a smaller version of the tool for the rear bushings?
__________________
Present: 1990 240GL saloon, 1992 240 estate
Past: 1988 240GL; 1971 144DL; 1972 145DL
DW42 is offline   Reply With Quote
The Following 2 Users Say Thank You to DW42 For This Useful Post:
Reply


Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 members and 1 guests)
 
Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off

Forum Jump


All times are GMT +1. The time now is 09:36.


Powered by vBulletin
Copyright ©2000 - 2021, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.