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PV, 120 (Amazon), 1800 General Forum for the Volvo PV, 120 and 1800 cars

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Bent Push Rod

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Old Jul 17th, 2024, 15:51   #51
142 Guy
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For snot-ball welders, brazing is generally a more forgiving technology. Less risk of burning a hole through the pan wall with too much heat. Your pan looks salvageable; but, the biggest issue will be is how straight / level is the mounting flange. If the flange is really distorted it will not seal. To avoid future oil leaks, I highly recommend the use of Hylomar Blue or Permatex Permashield (effectively same product) as a flange dressing on the pan because the original cork style gaskets will shrink and start leaking in less than a year. Definitely do not over torque the pan bolts because it distorts the flange and follow the instructions exactly for the Hylomar or Permashield dressing. If the flange is quite distorted, Permatex has this gasketless quick acting sealant that deals with large gaps. The problem is that it is rather permanent and requires a special oil pan separation tool if you ever need to get back in there.

In your second photo which shows the offending oil seal oozing out of the hole in the block, is it possible that the bolt head on the main bearing cap was interfering with the correct placement of the oil feed pipe? It almost looks like the pipe might be hitting the bolt head. That might be the reason for the mysterious bend in the later B20 oil feed pipe. Perhaps you already have a B20 oil pump in the engine. You would need to find some pictures to determine the difference between the B18 and B20 pump.
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Old Jul 17th, 2024, 15:55   #52
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Brazing is easier if you dont have decent welding gear for thin metal, nothing wrong with brazed joints in this application although Id perhaps have put a few more spots on it
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Old Jul 18th, 2024, 13:51   #53
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Pic 2 shows the bad seal and pic 3 shows the bent area that hits the pipe. This is the area that is cut out to clear the B20 pump. I think that if it isn't modified it hits the pipe and forces it out of position. There shouldn't be any shortages of B18 sumps in the USA. I suspect that any of the usual suspects can supply with the modification already done. Try Mike D at iRoll. Or Cameron at www.swedishrelics.com
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Old Jul 18th, 2024, 15:52   #54
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CA;

Congrats on getting the Oil Pan removed with engine in place(!), then finding the root-cause of the oil pressure issue (not fully seated Oil Supply Tube, clearly visible in second pic!)...if it was me, I'd remove one Main Bearing Cap to inspect if there was any damage to the bearings, but you didn't run very long at low oil pressure, and with the huge surface area of the bearings, I would expect and hope for little collateral damage...if this turns out to be the case (which I rather expect it will), you can consider yourself lucky in your bad luck...!

To correct the OST installation, I suggest removing the Oil Pump and OST, inspecting the Seal, then test-fitting the OST with Seal, at only the engine side, to see the insertion depth of the tube with Sealing Ring...I think you will find it will seat quite a bit further in, than is evident in the picture securing the Seal into position (the circumferential ring feature of the tube will be a lot further down the pocket, and this is why both 142Guy and I found it astonishing that a properly installed OST with Seal could leak...well now we know how it can...it wasn't properly installed!!).

In fact, it will take a serious push to bottom the tube with Seal, in its proper position...and when installing both ends of the tube at the same time when installing the Oil Pump it takes a combination of alternate pushes and alignments until BOTH ends of the tube are in their bottomed service position. When the previous installer did this operation, he clearly did not recognize this and was shy about applying the forces and alignment necessary...

Cheers!

Last edited by Ron Kwas; Jul 18th, 2024 at 18:29.
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Old Jul 19th, 2024, 03:06   #55
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ron Kwas View Post
CA;

I suggest removing the Oil Pump and OST, inspecting the Seal, then test-fitting the OST with Seal, at only the engine side, to see the insertion depth of the tube with Sealing Ring...

Cheers!
If it were me, that seal would be on its way to the garbage can. It looks like it might have got pinched between the oil feed pipe bulge and the block which could compromise its performance. I would not want to risk a repeat performance.

It is a bit of a grunt fest to get the pipe and seal into its proper position in the block and the pump. Even 'funner' doing it upside down on an in situ replacement - I dropped the pump on my face during the install narrowly missing a tooth. Safety glasses are always a good idea. I found silicone grease or some rubber friendly lube that stays in place to be of great assistance.
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Old Jul 19th, 2024, 16:22   #56
Ron Kwas
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142 Guy;

You're absolutely right about retiring and replacing that abused Seal! ...after all it was pushed around and deformed pretty badly by high oil pressure from behind...by my suggesting "inspecting the Seal, then test-fitting the OST with Seal", I just wanted CA to trial fit it, fully seated, so that he could see what a properly installed OST with Seal are supposed to look like! I should have added the suggestion to replace it...the Seal on the other end of OST deserves a good inspection also!

Cheers
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Old Yesterday, 16:17   #57
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I had a little time this weekend to work on the Volvo so here is the update.

I removed the old oil pump and compared it to the new B20 pump I got from VP Autoparts. The new oil pump looks like a genuine Volvo part that is made in China. It does not have any numbers/info stamped on it but the box says part #1218706. The old pump had raised numbers 418282 on it. It is similar but different. The upper part of it has little wings on it and I think this is the reason why the baffle needs to be modified. It is also longer (sits lower in the oil pan) but the oil pan still fits with a little cutting of the baffle (I will post some pictures of the baffle modification when I get the new oil pan).

I was able to install the B20 oil pump with the original straight B18 OST and it seems to fit (O rings pushed all the way in) but there is very little clearance (about 1/8") between the OST and the bolt that holds the main bearings caps in place. I actually think that is okay since neither of these parts move.

I'm still trying to source the "S curve" B20 OST and an oil pan. If I find the "S curve" B20 OST I mind try to fit that just to see.
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Old Yesterday, 17:50   #58
Ron Kwas
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CA;

If the OST clears the Main Bearing Cap Bolt, I totally agree...a mil is as good as a mile when nothing moves as they say, and typically the Oil Pump is installed after the Crank anyway, so I don't see an issue...

Thanks for update and very good comparison of the Oil Pumps and installation...I will have to add this very useful info to the site...!

Cheers

PS; Are you absolutely certain the B18 OST paired with a B20 OP fits correctly? I was under the impression that this combination was a no-go...I suggest and VERY careful inspection of the geometry of the OP output port and block input port, and depth of insertion of the OST to see how play together!...maybe that's the crux of the whole issue here!!

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